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Gene Quantification Newsletter
July 2014
is sponsored by

     
     

Streamlined and automated NGS workflow


 
  Dear researcher,
dear Gene Quantification page reader,

Our newsletter informs about the latest news in quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and RT-qPCR), which are compiled and summarised on the Gene Quantification domain. The focus of this newsletter issue is:
   


 

 

Hot Paper

microRNA Quality Control Study

Evaluation of quantitative miRNA expression platforms in the microRNA quality control (miRQC) study
Mestdagh P et al, Nat Methods. 2014 Jun 29

MicroRNAs are important negative regulators of protein-coding gene expression and have been studied intensively over the past years. Several measurement platforms have been developed to determine relative miRNA abundance in biological samples using different technologies such as small RNA sequencing, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and (microarray) hybridization. In this study, we systematically compared 12 commercially available platforms for analysis of microRNA expression. We measured an identical set of 20 standardized positive and negative control samples, including human universal reference RNA, human brain RNA and titrations thereof, human serum samples and synthetic spikes from microRNA family members with varying homology. We developed robust quality metrics to objectively assess platform performance in terms of reproducibility, sensitivity, accuracy, specificity and concordance of differential expression. The results indicate that each method has its strengths and weaknesses, which help to guide informed selection of a quantitative microRNA gene expression platform for particular study goals.

more microRNA papers miRNA.gene-quantification.info

 
Hot Paper

Considerations for accurate gene expression measurement

Considerations for accurate gene expression measurement by reverse transcription quantitative PCR when analysing clinical samples
Sanders R, Mason DJ, Foy CA, Huggett JF; Anal Bioanal Chem. 2014 May 25
 
Reverse transcription quantitative PCR is an established, simple and effective method for RNA measurement. However, technical standardisation challenges combined with frequent insufficient experimental detail render replication of many published findings challenging. Consequently, without adequate consideration of experimental standardisation, such findings may be sufficient for a given publication but cannot be translated to wider clinical application. This article builds on earlier standardisation work and the MIQE guidelines, discussing processes that need consideration for accurate, reproducible analysis when dealing with patient samples. By applying considerations common to the science of measurement (metrology), one can maximise the impact of gene expression studies, increasing the likelihood of their translation to clinical tools.

more normalisation papers normalisation.gene-quantification.info

 

Hot Paper

MS based draft on human proteome (mRNA expression vs. protein expression)

 

More than a decade after publication of the draft human genome sequence, there is no direct equivalent for the human proteome. But in this issue of Nature two groups present mass spectrometry-based analysis of human tissues, body fluids and cells mapping the large majority of the human proteome.

  • Akhilesh Pandey and colleagues identified 17,294 protein-coding genes and provide evidence of tissue- and cell-restricted proteins through expression profiling. They highlight the importance of proteogenomic analysis by identifying translated proteins from annotated pseudogenes, non-coding RNAs and untranslated regions. The data set is available on http://www.humanproteomemap.org
  • Bernhard Kuster and colleagues have assembled protein evidence for 18,097 genes in ProteomicsDB (available on https://www.proteomicsdb.org) and highlight the utility of the data, for example the identification of hundreds of translated lincRNAs, drug-sensitivity markers and discovering the quantitative relationship between mRNA and protein levels in tissues. Elsewhere in this issue, Vivien Marx reports on a third major proteomics project, the antibody-based Human Protein Atlas programme http://www.proteinatlas.org

Mass-spectrometry-based draft of the human proteome
Wilhelm M et al., Nature. 2014 509 (7502): 582-487

Proteomes are characterized by large protein-abundance differences, cell-type- and time-dependent expression patterns and post-translational modifications, all of which carry biological information that is not accessible by genomics or transcriptomics. Here we present a mass-spectrometry-based draft of the human proteome and a public, high-performance, in-memory database for real-time analysis of terabytes of big data, called ProteomicsDB. The information assembled from human tissues, cell lines and body fluids enabled estimation of the size of the protein-coding genome, and identified organ-specific proteins and a large number of translated lincRNAs (long intergenic non-coding RNAs). Analysis of messenger RNA and protein-expression profiles of human tissues revealed conserved control of protein abundance, and integration of drug-sensitivity data enabled the identification of proteins predicting resistance or sensitivity. The proteome profiles also hold considerable promise for analysing the composition and stoichiometry of protein complexes. ProteomicsDB thus enables navigation of proteomes, provides biological insight and fosters the development of proteomic technology.  http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v509/n7502/full/nature13319.html

A draft map of the human proteome
Kim MS et al., Nature. 2014 509 (7502): 575-581

The availability of human genome sequence has transformed biomedical research over the past decade. However, an equivalent map for the human proteome with direct measurements of proteins and peptides does not exist yet. Here we present a draft map of the human proteome using high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. In-depth proteomic profiling of 30 histologically normal human samples, including 17 adult tissues, 7 fetal tissues and 6 purified primary haematopoietic cells, resulted in identification of proteins encoded by 17,294 genes accounting for approximately 84% of the total annotated protein-coding genes in humans. A unique and comprehensive strategy for proteogenomic analysis enabled us to discover a number of novel protein-coding regions, which includes translated pseudogenes, non-coding RNAs and upstream open reading frames. This large human proteome catalogue (available as an interactive web-based resource at http://www.humanproteomemap.org) will complement available human genome and transcriptome data to accelerate biomedical research in health and disease.

more papers on mRNA.gene-quantification.info

 
 

NEW Journal -- "Biomolecular Detection and Quantification" -- Call for submissions

Biomolecular Detection and Quantification (bdq) is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to championing excellence in molecular study design, measurement, data analysis and reporting. Its focus is on the application of qualitative and quantitative molecular methodologies to all areas of clinical and life sciences. The journal has two main aims:

  • to provide a forum for discussion and recommendation of guidelines designed to improve the accuracy of molecular measurement, its data analysis and the transparency of its subsequent reporting;
  • to publish molecular biology based studies that adhere to best practice guidelines, both current and future.

Benefits of publishing open access with Elsevier's Biomolecular Detection and Quantification - www.journals.elsevier.com/biomolecular-detection-and-quantification/

  • Peer-reviewed journal indexed by Scopus and supporting ORCID and Crossref to help maintain your publication record.
  • A renowned and respected editorial team with extensive knowledge of your research field. BDQ was established by a group of scientists based on their experience developing and publishing the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time (and Digital) PCR Experiments (the MIQE and digital MIQE guidelines).
  • Reaching key audiences with 10 million active users per month using our publishing platform ScienceDirect.
  • Choice of user licenses so authors can decide how best to publish open access.
  • A discount on the publication fee for a limited time.

For more information about publishing Open Access with Elsevier, including funding body arrangements, institutional agreements and more, visit: www.elsevier.com/openaccess

We look forward to receiving your paper!

Kind regards,

The Editors
Stephen Bustin, Jim Huggett, Justin O'Grady, Michael W. Pfaffl, Carl Witwer, Ron Cook

View full editorial board

 
eConferences
streaming server

Join our new eConferences streaming webportal  --  Free access to all talk streams and poster PDFs !
eConferences.de  --  Amplify your knowledge!

This portal is dedicated to scientists from the community of qPCR, digital-PCR, NGS and Molecular Diagnostics. You’ll find here all the records from around 200 presentations held at qPCR & NGS Events in the past years – qPCR 2010 in Vienna, qPCR 2011 in Freising-Weihenstephan and qPCR & NGS 2013 in Freising-Weihenstephan.
We provide the presentations via movie streaming technology in high quality - high resolution and perfect sound quality in high speed - on any internet browser or mobile device, including Android or iOS.

Specialized Channel Topics:   MIQE guidelines  qPCR data analysis  and  digital PCR

Follow our Partner Channels:   Qiagen  RainDance  Exiqon   Bio-Rad  TATAA   and   MultiD 

 

GenEx 6:
real-time PCR data analysis software
 

GenEx 6 available - The most powerful tool for complex qPCR data analysis
GenEx is a popular software for qPCR data processing and analysis. 
Built in a modular fashion GenEx provides a multitude of functionalities for the qPCR community, ranging from basic data editing and management to advanced cutting-edge data analysis. Download GenEx User Guide

TATAA Biocenter, Europe´s leading provider of genomic services using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and MultiD Analyses, Europe’s prime software developer for the analysis of multivariate data, release GenEx version 6 for accurate analysis of qPCR data compliant with current Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines.

The new analyses in GenEx 6 include: Estimating PCR efficiency, testing for outliers, testing linear model, estimating dynamic range, estimating random error, estimating limit of detection, estimating limit of quantification, estimating concentrations of unknowns, evaluation of precision, and verification of precision. For all estimates confidence intervals are calculated.

Additional new features include: Transcript distribution for single cell analysis, Survival Analysis, Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC), Wizard for ProSeek protein analysis, and reader for 3DGene microRNA analysis.

View our GenEx webpage and download a FREE GenEx 6 trial version => GenEx.Gene-Quantification.info

Join all GenEx talks by Prof. Mikael Kubista held at recent qPCR & NGS Events:

 
Forward Please forward this qPCR NEWS to further scientists and friends who are interested in qPCR !
   

Best regards,

Michael W. Pfaffl
responsible Editor of the Gene Quantification Pages

 

   

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